Jacob 3

But behold, I, Jacob, would speak unto you that are pure in heart. Look unto God with firmness of mind, and pray unto him with exceeding faith, and he will console you in your afflictions, and he will plead your cause, and send down justice upon those who seek your destruction.

O all ye that are pure in heart, lift up your heads and receive the pleasing word of God, and feast upon his love; for ye may, if your minds are firm, forever.

(Jacob 3:1-2)

This follows up from Jacob 2, where Jacob faced the dilemma that because of the need to condemn particular sins his words could not offer the comfort others needed. What I like about these verses is that, although Jacob himself cannot offer consolation, there are other sources of comfort to be had, particularly though looking to God, prayer and receiving the word of God, which I believe includes both personal revelation and receiving the scriptures (and of course the latter should often include a degree of the former).

There are some topics, of course, that the scriptures don’t appear to address all that explicitly. But as I’ve also mentioned before (in reference to Jacob no less) the scriptures can address issues in far less direct and more subtle ways. The scriptures are the word of God, an inexhaustible well of inspiration, which we are invited to “liken” them unto ourselves and through which we can receive personal guidance and revelation.

Studying the scriptures in such a way is of course a very personal experience: what one sees or needs to see, may not be what other people need to see. Perhaps this is why the scriptures don’t address certain topics explicitly, and another reason why Jacob could point people to the “pleasing word of God” but not offer such comfort personally. Each of us is an individual, with our own issues and challenges, and – while there are fixed eternal truths – for our own different issues we need individual guidance to resolve them. But there is a common path by which we can receive that guidance, that through prayer and contemplation of the word of God we can each receive the individual comfort and counsel we need. But we cannot rely on others to walk that path for us: each of us personally must look towards God, pray to him and receive his “pleasing word”.

2020 edit:

This chapter really concludes Jacob’s sermon to his people. If chapter two was the first half, addressing the two specific areas of concern, in this second half Jacob first turns (as above) to those in his audience who may have been hurt by such sins (and by his necessary words about them), and then switches back to warning against sin and urging repentance and reformation on the part of his wider audience.

Behold, their husbands love their wives, and their wives love their husbands; and their husbands and their wives love their children; and their unbelief and their hatred towards you is because of the iniquity of their fathers; wherefore, how much better are you than they, in the sight of your great Creator?

(Jacob 3:7)

I find it interesting that Lamanite family life is so commended here (in contrast to the Nephite situation), and indeed seems always to have been comparatively healthy, when one looks at episodes like the stealing of the daughters of the Lamanites (Mosiah 20), or in the Sons of Mosiah’s mission to the Lamanites, and the role various wives and daughters (generally an unrepresented group in the Book of Mormon) played in that narrative. This rather healthy family life is not without divine reward, too: “because of this observance, in keeping this commandment, the Lord God will not destroy them, but will be merciful unto them; and one day they shall become a blessed people” (Jacob 3:6), despite other sins and unbelief which they inherited, so to speak, from their forefathers.

Wherefore, ye shall remember your children, how that ye have grieved their hearts because of the example that ye have set before them; and also, remember that ye may, because of your filthiness, bring your children unto destruction, and their sins be heaped upon your heads at the last day.

Jacob 3:10 here introduces an interesting corollary to this idea. If the Lamanites could end up the way they are because of the decisions of their ancestors, it follows this may not be a one-off: the Nephites, and for that matter any of us, could act in ways that bring disastrous consequences upon following generations, with little choice on their part. And I think one can see this, when one looks at the generational consequences that can accompany things like abuse, addiction, family break-up, or apostasy. It’s this phenomenon that I believe is reflected in scriptural statements such as those in Exodus 20:5 about the “the iniquity of the fathers” being ‘visited’ “upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me”. This doesn’t mean that those successive generations have been abandoned by God or left without hope: after all, neither were (or were to be) later generations of the Lamanites. But it does mean that our actions, including our sins, can have wider consequences than just ourselves and those we directly sin against.

2 thoughts on “Jacob 3

  1. Pingback: Why go to church – David's random ramblings

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