The Omniscience of God | Religious Studies Center

Since the topic has come up in correspondence, and some things I’m writing (both for a book and for this blog), I happened to come across this article in my reading, and thought it was good enough that I wanted to share it: “The Omniscience of God” by Roger Terry.

I wanted to share it, however, not just for what it addresses about God’s omniscience and relationship to time (though those are very worth reading), but also for some profound points it makes at the end, some profound points that I think often get overlooked in such debates:

Thus far we have talked about God’s omniscience primarily in the sense that He sees everything and has all information present before Him. But all the knowledge in the universe would not make our Heavenly Father a perfect or even helpful God without His other attributes, such as love, justice, mercy, goodness, patience, and kindness. One attribute in particular that enables Him to use His infinite knowledge to bless His children is His wisdom. Wisdom is actually an important aspect, or product, of God’s knowledge. Wisdom, we might say, is knowing how to apply knowledge correctly. Thus, because He has perfect wisdom, God always knows which choice will create the greatest eternal good for His children. His wisdom prevents Him from ever misapplying His knowledge, as we imperfect mortals often do.

President Marion G. Romney, First Counselor in the First Presidency, wrote:

‘Since knowledge is an “acquaintance with, or clear perception of, facts”; and “wisdom is the capacity of judging soundly and dealing broadly with facts; especially in their practical” application “to life and conduct,” it follows that wisdom, although more than, is nevertheless a product of, and is dependent upon knowledge.
The Book of Mormon specifically relates God’s wisdom to his knowledge. Speaking of God’s plan for the salvation of men, Lehi says, “All things have been done in the wisdom of him who knoweth all things” (2 Nephi 2:24). Thus, . . . God’s perfect wisdom is a product of His knowledge of all things.’

Certainly, His wisdom is a product of His knowledge, but it is also a product of His goodness, for knowledge alone does not automatically produce wisdom. Lucifer had great knowledge, but that knowledge did not lead to wisdom. Indeed, Lucifer’s unwise choices prevented him from attaining greater knowledge. It is God’s perfect knowledge combined with His perfect goodness that makes His perfect wisdom a reality. And because God has perfect wisdom to apply His perfect knowledge, He is able to perform His work and enjoy the associated glory in bringing “to pass the immortality and eternal life of man” (Moses 1:39).

In debates about omniscience and omnipotence, it should be remembered that while these are necessary qualities for God to do all that he promised and for us to have confidence in him, they are not all that defines or characterises God. We likewise should not forget his love, justice, mercy, goodness, patience, kindness and his wisdom.

Read the whole article at The Omniscience of God | Religious Studies Center

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The Stealing of the Daughters of the Lamanites

As announced, here’s an article in PDF format, entitled ‘The Daughters of the Lamanites and the Daughters of Shiloh’. This is based on research that subsequently (mostly for reasons of space), never ended up in my book, and examines the possible connections between the story of the stealing of the daughters of the Lamanites, found in Mosiah 20, and that of the stealing of the daughters of Shiloh, found in Judges 21, and the possible meaning behind any deliberate connections.

The Daughters of the Lamanites and the Daughters of Shiloh

I’ve also created a new page – PDF Articles – for this and for future articles I release on this blog.

Upcoming articles

Just as a notice, I plan to release several Book of Mormon related articles via this blog in the coming months as downloadable PDFs. First shall be “The Daughters of Shiloh and the Daughters of the Lamanites”, which examines the possible relationship between the stories in Mosiah 20 and Judges 21. This is based on material that was originally intended for my thesis/book but omitted due to length. This will likely be followed by “The Book of Mormon and the ‘great man’ theory of history”, based on a presentation I gave at a conference several years ago now about how the Book of Mormon depicts historical cause and effect.

Following these, there are several posts on this blog – primarily those about Deuteronomy and the Book of Mormon – I plan to make available as PDF articles, possibly with some revision and expansion (I have several ideas in mind for showing the linkages between the two). The original posts will continue to remain available.